Max Wolf Valerio

OK I admit it. I was Greta Garbo, or was that–Shulamith Firestone? humanity has begun to outgrow nature. the pendulum, a dark stone, a discretion. restless inside limitation—a remote intelligence latent—residing throughout a row of gender-neutral wombs. spectral under glass domes, one incubated awareness after another is awakened and separated, each from the other. their eyes open to assure the elimination of the sexual classes … Continue reading Max Wolf Valerio

Jay Lucero

Attempting to Behead the Grounded:       When the grapefruit sun shines on my left cheek       awakening flames/ giving light to the unseen       my face becomes global, with bodies galore.       You see: a birthplace,       ancestors, and traces of oddities like me. Brown femmes carve a place in the constellating universe. Now you know we’re stars.       The moon glitters on my right cheek       where a conglomerate celebration of … Continue reading Jay Lucero

Three Poems by Susan Lewis

Silence, Wastrel   Mind the Gap   Mouth My Idea     Susan Lewis is the editor of Posit and the author of nine books and chapbooks, most recently Heisenberg’s Salon (Blazevox, 2017), This Visit (Blazevox, 2015), How to be Another (Cervena Barva Press, 2014), and State of the Union (Spuyten Duyvil Press, 2014). Her tenth book, Zoom, is the winner of the 2017 Washington … Continue reading Three Poems by Susan Lewis

Kaveh Akbar

UNTITLED WITH HUNGER AND MATCHHEADS Kaveh Akbar is the founding editor of Divedapper. His poems appear recently or soon in The New Yorker, Poetry, Ploughshares, APR, Tin House, and elsewhere. His debut full-length collection, Calling a Wolf a Wolf, will be published by Alice James Books in September 2017; he is also the author of the chapbook Portrait of the Alcoholic. The recipient of a … Continue reading Kaveh Akbar

Questioning the Role of Saying: A Review of Ari Banias’ Anybody

Review by Eli Lynch-El Bechelany Anybody Ari Banias W.W. Norton & Company 2016 The most excited I’ve been about my creative writing degree was while creating a list of readings for my independent study, staring at my computer at 2am with dry eyes, researching and writing down the names of authors, centering queer, trans, and BIPOC voices. This was the first time it’s been possible … Continue reading Questioning the Role of Saying: A Review of Ari Banias’ Anybody

This Is Not Fake: Who Are We, Animals, in the Anthrome? A Review of Make Yourself Happy by Eleni Sikelianos

Review by Melissa Buckheit Make Yourself Happy Eleni Sikelianos Coffeehouse Press, 2017 Breathe. Make yourself happy. Resist. Remember what you are. Insist and document, observe. Cry. Laugh. Do not die completely. Listen and then, speak. Live. If Eleni Sikelianos’ new book had a simple mantra, this might be it. Into the living and dying field of our biosphere, Eleni Sikelianos surges forth in Make Yourself … Continue reading This Is Not Fake: Who Are We, Animals, in the Anthrome? A Review of Make Yourself Happy by Eleni Sikelianos

Two Poems by Nayrouz Abu Hatoum

  Fall   1. With dreamy eyes, you hosted my gaze and your lips… a well intensifies my thrust.   ❖❖❖❖❖❖❖   2. I wrote you into a poem because this is how I learned to host love back home… now, I am left to grieve twice the weight of loss.   ❖❖❖❖❖❖❖   3. Our eyes traced each other,
and gazed through the shades of fig … Continue reading Two Poems by Nayrouz Abu Hatoum

Two Poems by Raji Bathish

                                        translated by Suneela Mubayi     Maybe, were I to die   You will cry alone, a little between a ski holiday and a wine party so that your tears fall on your pristine, sterilized dining table and you do not find dust to dance with You cry a lot and remember me a little in permitted doses that are not harmful you remember how … Continue reading Two Poems by Raji Bathish

Two Poems by Colette Arrand

  On Watching Tiny House Hunters in a Waiting Room   The boyfriend wants to live in the kind of house seen in viral Facebook posts: small beaux arts, miniscule arts and crafts; intricate monuments to the necessary minimization our kind. The girlfriend struggles with the size of the kitchen. Here, he says, anything can be our kitchen. He’s saved a little money and wants … Continue reading Two Poems by Colette Arrand